Events

Evanston Community History Project (ongoing)

Documenting the COVID-19 pandemic

The Evanston History Center announces the launch of an archive dedicated to documenting the COVID-19 pandemic. We are now seeking digital contributions, from images to documents. We want to ensure that Evanston’s experiences are documented for future generations.

What would you want people to know about this time 100 years from now?

You can use this form to contribute to contribute to the archive.

Contributions can be written directly on the form. You may also upload files (images, word documents, and pdfs) directly on the form.) Please make sure you identify your items by providing as much information as you are able. Name of creator, date created, place, etc.

There are no rules to what you can contribute. It may be an idea, an observation, a reflection, a sign on a shop, the record of your day, an image, your feelings about Evanston’s particular response to the pandemic, etc. These contributions will constitute a community record of this time. We will house them in a new collection that will be available to researchers at the Evanston History Center at a later date. Contributions may be anonymous.

By contributing , you grant EHC the right to include the contributed material in the archive. Any copyrights held on the material will be honored. The archive is intended for research purposes only.

Although we are not currently accepting physical donations to the archive, we hope that you will consider preserving items for future donation.

Please contact Jenny Thompson at jthompson@evanstonhistorycenter.org with questions or to submit your contribution via email. Thank you for contributing your story!


Events
Click to make a reservation for upcoming events.
For more info on each event please scroll down.

Upcoming Events

Under the Buffalo Lecture
Series: Winter 2020


This event has been postponed until further notice. We plan to reschedule and will widely publicize the new date.

Click here to learn more about the measures EHC is implementing around COVID-19.

“Evanston Women and the Fight for the Vote”
Presentation by Lori Osborne
Reception 6:30 pm
Lecture 7:00 pm
Evanston History Center, 225 Greenwood Street, Evanston, IL
Admission: $10. Payable at the door. MC/Visa/Cash. EHC Members are Free!

August 2020 marks the centennial of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, which gave American women the right to vote. Evanston women were integral to the local, state, and national suffrage movements. Women such as Frances Willard, Elizabeth Boynton Harbert, and Catharine Waugh McCulloch created successful strategies in support of broader citizenship rights for all women. Lori Osborne, EHC Historian and Director of the Evanston Women’s History Project, will give a talk based on her research for EHC’s exhibit, “Evanston Women and the Fight for the Vote,” which opens March 8, 2020.


Year of Suffrage!

August 26, 2020, will mark a significant moment in American women’s history: the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, giving women the right to vote. Evanston women were integral to the local, state and national women’s suffrage movements.

New Exhibit!
The exhibit Evanston Women and the Fight for the Vote is now open!

This new exhibit at the Evanston History Center commemorates the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment which gave American women the right to vote.

Evanston Women and the Fight for the Vote shares the story of the critical role that Evanston women like Frances Willard, Elizabeth Boynton Harbert, and Catharine Waugh McCulloch, and many others played in local, state, and national women’s suffrage movements. The exhibit will explore the tactics and strategies that suffragists used through the use of original artifacts, archival materials, costumes, and photographs from the EHC collection.

Evanston Women and the Fight for the Vote will be up through December of 2020. The exhibit will be open on Thursday – Sunday from 1:00 – 4:00 pm. Regular admission is $10, free for children 10 and under.

Rightfully Hers, a popup exhibition from the National Archives commemorating the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment. Rightfully Hers contains simple messages exploring the history of the ratification of the 19th amendment, women’s voting rights before and after the 19th, and its impact today. The exhibit will be on display through January at the Evanston Civic Center, 2nd Floor Gallery, 2100 Ridge Avenue

To see a full list of 2020 events click here to visit the Evanston Women’s History Project site.

Under the Buffalo Lecture
Series: Fall 2020


The Watergate Girl:
My Fight for Truth and Justice Against a Criminal President

A presentation by Jill Wine-Banks
Thursday, September 17, 2020
Reception 6:30 pm
Lecture 7:00 pm
Evanston History Center, 225 Greenwood Street, Evanston, IL
Admission: $10. Payable at the door. MC/Visa/Cash. EHC Members are Free!

Reservations Recommended: Make a reservation here.

A book signing, made possible by Bookends and Beginnings, will follow the presentation. Copies of The Watergate Girl will be on sale at the event.

Join us for a presentation by Jill Wine-Banks whose recently published memoir, The Watergate Girl, explores a variety of issues that resonate today.

About The Watergate Girl:

Obstruction of justice, lies from the White House, sexism at work, shocking revelations: Jill Wine-Banks takes us inside her trial by fire as a Watergate prosecutor.

It was a time, much like today, when Americans feared for the future of their democracy and women stood up for equal treatment. At the crossroads of the Watergate scandal and the women’s movement stood a young lawyer named Jill Wine Volner (as she was then known), barely thirty years old and the only woman on the team that prosecuted the highest-ranking White House officials. Called “the mini-skirted lawyer” by the press, she fought to receive the respect accorded her male counterparts―and prevailed.

In The Watergate Girl, Jill Wine-Banks takes us inside this troubled time in American history, and it is impossible to read about the crimes of Richard Nixon and the people around him without drawing parallels to today’s headlines. The book is also the story of a young woman who sought to make her professional mark while trapped in a failing marriage, buffeted by sexist preconceptions, and harboring secrets of her own. Her house was burgled, her phones were tapped, and even her office garbage was rifled through.

At once a cautionary tale and an inspiration for those who believe in the power of justice and the rule of law, The Watergate Girl is a revelation about our country, our politics, and who we are as a society.

Jill Wine-Banks is an MSNBC legal analyst, appearing regularly on the network’s primetime and daytime shows and also appearing on PBS, Canadian and Australian networks, Sirius XM, NPR and other radio shows and podcasts. She began her career as an organized crime prosecutor at the U.S. Department of Justice, which led to her selection as one of three assistant Watergate special prosecutors in the obstruction of justice trial against President Nixon’s top aides. She has also served as general counsel of the U.S. Army, solicitor general and deputy attorney general of the state of Illinois, and chief operating officer of the American Bar Association. In each case, she was the first woman to hold the position. She is a graduate of the University of Illinois and the Columbia Law School. She has written OpEds for the NBC.com, Chicago Tribune, Politico, and Huffington Post. She has also been featured in several documentaries and films, including Academy Award winner Charles Ferguson’s Watergate, or How We Got Control of an Out of Control President, Robert Redford’s All The President’s Men Revisited, ABC 20/20, and Michael Moore’s Farenheit 11/9.

Read more about Jill Wine-Banks

Many thanks to Bookends and Beginnings for making the book signing for this event possible!